Toy Story 3 and stuff...

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Toy Story 3 and stuff...

Post  Ajan Thunder on Fri Jan 28, 2011 10:57 am

Toy Story 3

Toy Story 3 is about a group of 13 toys coming to terms with how their owner Andy is going to college and leaving them behind. As Andy was in the process of putting them away in the attic, he gets side tracked and his mother accidentally takes the toys and donates them to the local daycare. Sunnyside Daycare turns out to be a nightmare, with one toy ruling the place with an iron fist sending all new toys to be played with by preschoolers only to be severely damaged and possibly destroyed. It is up to Woody to devise a plan to escape and bring his friends back to the safety of their home so they can be stored in the attic for the future to be played with.

The symbolic archetype that suits Toy Story 3 the best would be Freedom vs. Entrapment. With all the hardships the toys have to go through in the third movie, home almost seems like freedom (not that they ever felt they were trapped). After coping with the thought that the toys were abandoned to be thrown out like junk, they jumped into the donation box of toys for the Sunnyside Daycare and welcomed the change with open arms looking for a new opportunity to be played with every single day. As soon as they get there, the daycare seems like heaven with all the luxuries toys could ever want: children to play with them, spare parts, even a dream house for Barbie and Ken. But it turns out after the introduction to be a living hell for them. Buzz Lightyear and the gang have to “play” with preschoolers, only to be smashed, thrown, chewed, colored on, and even slobbered all over. The toys also have to live behind bars when nightfall comes; it’s very similar to a prison. And not only were they trapped inside the preschoolers’ room, but the toys had to deal with the thought of being physically abused everyday for the rest of their lives. It’s as much of a physical prison as it is mentally. Knowing what is going to come up the next time, but being unable to change the inevitable.

There are many situational archetypes that would fit with Toy Story 3, but the one that stood out the most is The Unhealable Wound. It was revealed by a toy that used to be owned by the same owner Lots-O’ had, that the dictator teddy bear Lots-O’-Huggin’ Bear thought he was abandoned by his previous owner and made his journey into depression and anger which leads up to him making a system in the daycare where he is on top. The whole story is that he gets lost/forgotten at a park with two other toys by his owner years back, so at the place they were left the toys waited for days. After they realized that the owner wasn’t coming back for them, they decide to take initiative and go and find their way back to their home. As the toys approach the house, Lots-O’ discovers that his owner replaced him with a toy that’s identical to him. Not only did this mental scar destroy him, but it greatly affects all the other toys around him. He told the two other toys that all three of them got replaced, but in reality it was only Lots-O’. They go on a journey, that isn’t shown in great detail, to find Sunnyside Daycare. It makes it even more painful for Lots-O’ because the way the other toy described it, no other toy had the bond that Lots-O’ and his owner had. The difference between this Unhealable wound compared to the others given in the examples, is that the wound destroys who Lots-O’ is instead of the wound making something more out of him. For example, Frodo retains his past in the Shire even after getting stabbed by the Ringwraith. It’s almost as if it adds another chapter to Frodo’s life. Lots-O’ on the other hand is comparable to Darth Vader, where the loss of something they hold dearly is gone which fills them with depression and anger only to turn to the darker side of them, completely destroying who they were creating a much more powerful but evil character.

Woody the Cowboy falls into The Outcast archetype. It’s not that he was banished by his fellow toys; it’s that he figured they would be better off at Sunnyside and that he was going to be with his owner Andy in college. In the process, he finds himself on his way back home to get stuck in a tree after paragliding off of the daycare. A little child finds him and takes Woody back to her place so she can keep him and play with him. As nightfall comes, he learns that his friends are trapped in Sunnyside, only to possibly be destroyed. So he goes back by himself to Sunnyside to help break them out, reuniting Woody with his friends. They hatch a plan, almost escape but get confronted by Lots-O’s, find themselves in a landfill. Escape the landfill and run back home before Andy could leave for college. Because they’re all not apart of the daycare community, Woody and the gang could be considered Outcasts. They were the toys that managed not to be sold in the various garage sales; they were the ones who avoided the donation boxes. They are the Outcasts.
I feel watching the movie justifies everything I stated in the previous paragraphs. I also thought this movie was an excellent send-off to a great series. Hopefully I didn’t ruin the entire movie for the other people who have not yet seen it.

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Woody

Post  melanie3329 on Fri Jan 28, 2011 11:57 am

Another situational archetype that would apply to Toy Story 3 is the Task archetype. Throughout most of the film Woody has a huge task of first getting back to the daycare, then getting over the walls to get back onto the premises, and then he has to get him and all his friends out of the daycare safely and without gettting caught. The story specifically apply's to the the Task archetype and not the Journey archetype because Woody needs to help all of andy's toys (a separate world of toy friends), by helping all of them escape he is making himself take his rightful postition as the leader of the group, and getting out of the daycare is almost a superhuman deed. All of those aspects are in the descripition of the Task archetype, therefore making Woody have to Task archetype.

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other situational archetype?

Post  catherineleggett on Sun Jan 30, 2011 10:21 am

I think that maybe another situational archetype present in the film could be the nature versus mechanistic world archetype. During the parts of the film where the toys are happy, they tend to be outside, for instance at the beginning where they are pretending to be outdoors having an adventure. In all the parts of the movie where the characters aren't happy and feel trapped, they are stuck away from nature. For instance they are stuck inside the daycare centre and cannot escape for a good part of the film. Then, when the toys finally do, they are put into a garbage truck, and almost put into a furnace at the dump. All the dangerous and noisy machines during this part of the film that pose a threat to the toys seem to represent the mechanistic world. At the end of the film when the toys reach their goal of becoming free again and finally get the chance to be happy, they get to be played with outside on Bonnie's front lawn. The bright sun, and pure colours of the grass and sky seem to underscore their freedom and happiness, especially when contrasted to the harshness and dimness of where they were before.


Last edited by catherineleggett on Sun Jan 30, 2011 12:16 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : made a mistake)

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Toy Story 3 - Light vs. Darkness

Post  Misha2828 on Sun Jan 30, 2011 2:20 pm

Throughout the movie, there seems to be a strong sense of the symbolic archetype of light vs. darkness. The light found in Andy’s house, Bonnie’s house and, when it is first introduced, Sunnyside Daycare represents a place of safety and happiness, while the darkness of the garbage bag the toys are in and Sunnyside Daycare at night represents a place of despair, suffering, and a lack of hope.
The idea of false hope with false sunlight also comes to mind, or rather the idea of heaven’s light and hellfire. (Sorry to use the words of Disney’s the Hunchback of Notre Dame, but they work quite perfectly.) When they are on the conveyor belt, they believe that they have reached the light at the end of a dark tunnel, and are provided with a brief moment of hope. That hope is soon ripped from them and replaced with panic when they realize that what they thought was sunlight is actually an incinerator. They mistake hellfire for heaven's light, and are briefly drawn to it.
I realize that the second part wasn't really given to us, but I felt that it applied and was a part of the light vs. darkness archetype.

This was a great analysis overall. I enjoyed reading it.
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Re: Toy Story 3 and stuff...

Post  Ajan Thunder on Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:02 pm

Thanks for the posts and the reasonable ideas to include into the list of archetypes Toy Story 3 falls under. But going back to Melanie's post, Woody didn't do anything that was a "superhuman deed". All it takes is cunning and being able to execute a plan to escape out of a place that's heavily guarded and watched over, take Prison Break or the Bourne Trilogy as examples. Actually there's also nothing human about Woody at all other than him being a plush cowboy. Also to add to his rightful place as leader, he was always the leader even when he wasn't there. Buzz couldn't step up to the plate and take charge, only to have him restored back to the factory setting and all his friends living behind bars. He didn't have to establish himself again, because he was and always will be the leader.
Now going to Catherine's post, technology was also their friend at times given them a chance at reconnecting with Andy. The cellphone at the beginning, the claw that saves them at the end and don't forget about the garbage truck that transported them back home at Andy's place. Despite the fact that those machines were all last resorts at saving their lives or trying to get Andy to play with them, it doesn't mean that the machines were an enemy to them of any sort. Even Buzz Lightyear is a machine in a way, with his built in wings that light up and his various catch phrases.
And Misha, that post is well justified and I have nothing to say to that because I think it sounds right.
Sorry if a sounded like a douche replying to those posts...

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Re: Toy Story 3 and stuff...

Post  Maxwell Oginz on Tue Feb 01, 2011 7:47 pm

Great job Aja, you pointed out some archetypes that are very pertinent to the story.

I think a really powerful Situational archaetype that i'd like to mention is that of the initiation. Although the toys really do steal the show in this movie, Andy is and has been a huge part of the story as a whole, seeing as all Toy Story movies are about the toys getting back to Andy. This initiation comes at the end of the film when Andy decides to give his toys to the little girl who lives down the street from him. He is initiated into his new life as an adult by an act of kindness and good faith. By giving his toys away he is passing along something that will always be a part of him.

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Post  Mr. C on Sun Feb 06, 2011 4:50 pm

Aja - great job. (And no you are not a douche for replying to the posts). Your analysis and the subsequent postings make this an especially thorough review. The only thing I might comment on is the comparison of LotsO and Darth Vader. I think LotsO is more of an Emperor (Palpatine) character and that the one-eyed baby is more like Darth Vader. In fact, they even ripped off Star Wars with the baby throwing LotsO just like Vader did with the Emperor. The baby, and Vader, were ultimately redeemed. LotsO and the Emperor could not be - that is why they had to be destroyed.
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